Cardinal Cajetan

Thomas Cardinal Cajetan’s Old Testament Canon

Cardinal Cajetan was an opponent of Martin Luther but Cajetan's Old Testament Canon views were in opposition to what his church would later dogmatize.
1870 (oil on canvas) painting of Martin Luther and Thomas Cardinal Cajetan during the controversy over Luther’s 95 Theses. By Pauwels, Ferdinand Wilhelm (source).

Thomas Cardinal Cajetan (1469–1534) is best known for challenging Martin Luther, early in Luther’s 16th century effort to reform corruption in the Western church. Cajetan was a leading theologian and papal legate in Augsburg who served as a spokesman for Catholic opposition to Luther. In many respects, the historical record paints Cajetan as an intelligent, measured interlocutor. Sympathy with the need for reform and agreement with some positions of his opponent(s) are evident in his views. With this perspective in mind, what can we learn from Cajetan’s Old Testament canon views?

Thomas Cardinal Cajetan’s Old Testament Canon Read More »

The Origin of the Eliakim-Peter Typology, Part 2: Rambling Reformers

St. Bartholomew's Day massacre of 1572 formed the geopolitical backdrop for "defenders and interpreters" (rambling reformers) who promoted temporal authority of the papacy
Perhaps the most notorious episode of Roman Catholic Counter-Reformation violence. In 1572, during marriage celebrations for a Catholic princess and a Protestant king, 2,000+ French Protestants were murdered on the streets of Paris. News of event sparked more massacres around the country. The “popular” element of the violence was striking: victims were often known to perpetrators and Catholic powers praised the killings. French Protestants saw a wave of exile and conversion.[1]Gibbons, Katy. “Five of the Most Violent Moments of the Reformation.” The Conversation. (The Conversation US, Inc., 24 Jan. 2022).
(image source: Cantonal Museum of Fine Arts, via Wikimedia Commons)

An apologetic army of seeks reinforcements from rambling reformers of the past

In the first post of this series, we saw how the Eliakim-Peter typology claim has become a popular defense for the papacy in recent years and how it appears to have made it’s first appearance in the U.S. in the early 1990’s, courtesy of a popular “Protestant” convert to Roman Catholicism. I mentioned how the claim was dredged from the recesses of the Roman Catholic Counter-Reformation, after laying dormant for around four centuries. The claim grew slowly after it’s reintroduction but now the curious case of theological amnesia is fully cured and a new generation of philosophers is poised to twist and distort Scripture, using their newfangled typology as bait, fishing for men who are wading in the Tiber, hungry with angst. To accomplish their mission, the new army of sacramental soldiers will need to improve upon the work of the defenders and interpreters of old, who we will meet in this post. The new army is scrounging for morsels in church history and is only just beginning to rediscover their forgotten fathers from the Early Modern period. The historical reinforcements they seek are ones I spent months searching for and I’ll these Rambling Reformers here.

References

References
1Gibbons, Katy. “Five of the Most Violent Moments of the Reformation.” The Conversation. (The Conversation US, Inc., 24 Jan. 2022).

The Origin of the Eliakim-Peter Typology, Part 2: Rambling Reformers Read More »

Scroll to Top